Water “Fast Facts”

 Cascade

  • If every American household simply reduced water usage by 1/3, we could save millions of dollars each day, and more than 5 billion gallons of water per year. (Source - http://www.howtodothings.com/family-relationships/how-to-save-water)
  • The earth has 326,000,000,000,000,000,000 gallons of water. Less than 1% is suitable for drinking.
  • Water leaving our homes generally goes either into a septic tank in the back yard where it evaporates or seeps back into the ground, or is sent to a sewage-treatment plant through a sewer system. (Source – http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/qahome.html)
  • The average person uses about 80-100 gallons of water in their home per day. The largest use of household water is flushing the toilet, and after that, taking showers and baths. (Source – http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/qahome.html)
  • Many local governments now have laws that specify that water faucets, toilets, and showers only allow a certain amount of water flow per minute. If you look really close at the head of a faucet, you might see something like “1.5 gpm,”, which means that the faucet head will allow water to flow at a maximum of 1.5 gallons per minute. (Source – http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/qahome.html)
  • Ever wonder how much rain you’re getting when you have a big storm over your house? If your house sits on a one-half acre lot, and you get a storm that drops 1 inch of rain – you’ve just received 13,577 gallons of water in your yard! (Source – http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/qahome.html)
  • A big bath holds about 50 gallons of water, so if you could save that inch of water that fell, you could take a daily bath for 271 days! (Careful now, that 13,577 gallons of water weighs over 56 tons … so don’t put it in your bathtub all at once). (Source – http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/qahome.html
  • On average, leaky toilets waste about 22 gallons per day. How do you know if you have a leaky toilet? Add some food dye to your toilet water tank and then don’t use it for a couple hours. If the color becomes lighter, you have a leak. (Source – http://www.howtodothings.com/family-relationships/how-to-save-water)
  • How can you determine whether you have leaks? Turn off all water-use in your house for a couple hours. Check your water meter at the beginning and see if it has moved at the end. If it moves, you have a leak that must be repaired. (Source - http://www.howtodothings.com/family-relationships/how-to-save-water)
  • Water plants and lawn only in the coolest times of day. That way, you can get away with watering less frequently, because less water will be lost to evaporation from the sun’s heat. It’s better for your plants anyway. Better yet, use mulch in your yard. Mulch locks more moisture into the ground, protecting it further from evaporation and allowing you to save water. (Source – http://www.howtodothings.com/family-relationships/how-to-save-water)
  • Water down the drain is totally wasted. So you just steamed some vegetables and you have leftover water? Instead of throwing it down the drain, use it to water plants! Even though it’s way too hot to water immediately, you can set it aside to cool down. If you collect the runoff from your gutters during a rainstorm, that water can be used to nourish your garden as well. (Source – http://www.howtodothings.com/family-relationships/how-to-save-water)
  • A shower that runs constantly even for five minutes uses up anywhere from 25 to 50 gallons of water! Even a running faucet can use about 3 gallons per minute. Turn the water on only at the moment you need it, and turn it off immediately afterward. (Source – http://www.howtodothings.com/family-relationships/how-to-save-water)
  • If you turn the water off while brushing your teeth, you can save up to 5 gallons of water a day!
  • By using a tankless water heater, you can save up to 40% on your household water bill!
  • Water conservation facts by the numbers (Source - http://planetgreen.discovery.com/go-green/green-water/green-water-statistics.html):
    - 2.5 gallons: The amount of water per person much of the world is allocated.
    - 400 gallons: The amount of water per person used by the average American citizen; 30 percent of this is Irrigationused for outdoor purposes, such as watering the lawn.
    - 70 percent: The amount of worldwide water use that is allocated to farming; most of these farming irrigation systems operate at only 40 percent efficiency.
    - 1430: Gallons of water per capita in the United States; only 100 gallons of that is household use per person as most is used for agriculture, according to water expert Peter Gleick.
    - 88 percent: Of deaths from diarrhea are caused from unsafe drinking water, inadequate availability of water for hygiene, and lack of access to sanitation; this translates to more than 1.5 million of the 1.9 million children under five who perish from diarrhea each year. This amounts to 18% of all under-five deaths and means that more than 4,000 children are dying every day as a result of diarrhoeal diseases.
    - $11.3 billion: The amount of money required to provide basic levels of service for drinking and waste water in Africa and Asia.
    - $35 billion: The amount of money spent on bottled water in the most developed countries in the world.
    - 1.5 million: Barrels of crude oil used for making PET water bottles, globally. This is enough oil to fuel 100,000 American cars for a year.
    - 2.7 tons: The amount of plastic used to bottle water. 86 percent becomes garbage or litter.